‘Geographic research and news’ Category


Faculty-Student Research on Glacier Change in Ecuador

Congratulations to Geography Professor Jeff La Frenierre and Geography and Environmental Studies double major Helen Thompson (’17) for being awarded a Gustavus Presidential Faculty-Student Collaboration Grant for 2015 for their study Hydrological Implications of Glacier Retreat on Andean Volcanoes. They will travel to Ecuador in June for a three-week field season at Volcán Chimborazo. Their […]


Talk: Drones for Science? Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Glacial Watershed Mapping in the Peruvian Andes

Gustavus Adolphus Geography and Environmental Studies present: Drones for Science? Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Glacial Watershed Mapping in the Peruvian Andes Oliver Wigmore, Department of Geography, Ohio State University Thursday May 7, 2015 at 7:00 pm Location: TBD The glaciers of the Peruvian Andes are rapidly retreating, transforming the hydrology and impacting the socio-economic […]


“How to teach about climate without making your students feel hopeless”

Dr. Diana Liverman, a geographer at the University of Arizona, published this piece on the pedagogy of climate change in last month’s Washington Post. “[In the past,] students left my class feeling despondent and powerless. . .How would my students be motivated to do something if they felt paralyzed by fear and hopelessness? . . […]


Irish immigration to rural Minnesota: Gustavus study featured in Rochester’s PostBulletin

Professor Emeritus of Geography, Bob Douglas, and former Gustavus student Carl Cronin’s study of Irish immigration to Minnesota is featured in today’s Rochester Post-Bulletin: “Douglas undertook his mapping of Irish population in Olmsted County after conducting a survey of historic locales for the Olmsted County Planning Department. He and a student, Eric Cronin, combed through […]

Super Bowl LXVIII and the Geography of Fans

If you live in Seattle you’ll likely be cheering for the Seahawks, and if you live in Denver you’ll likely be rooting for the Broncos. But what if you live in Arco, Idaho, equidistant between Denver and Seattle? This New York Times journalist travels to Arco to find out Super Bowl loyalties.


Climate and human migration

What does climate change mean for human migration? Will the world be overrun with climate refugees? Wilfrid Laurier University geographer Robert McLeman, the author of the recent book Climate and Human Migration, provides an interesting interview in the weekly news magazine Maclean’s. “People are already on the move, in the same way they’ve always responded […]


Earth wind map

You may remember this very cool map of real-time winds over the U.S. Now here is the same idea for the entire earth. (Click on the word “Earth” to see a legend and change values.) Brrr. Just look at that Arctic air traveling over Minnesota!


Mining the Moon

Last month a Nevada-based company filed a request with the U.S. government to gain rights to eventually mine the moon. The moon could be source of platinum, titanium, and other rare earth materials. Read more at this National Geographic Daily News article.


Student Debt: Where in the U.S. is it Highest and Lowest?

A recent report by the Institute for College Access and Success provides information on student debt, including data on student debt by state and region. Nationwide, both the amount of student debt and the percentage of students graduating with debt are increasing. In 2013, 71 percent of graduates had debt and the average debt was […]


Why do the tropics have the highest biodiversity?

A long-standing problem in biogeography is to explain the gradient of biodiversity that decreases as latitude increases. Why do the tropics have the world’s greatest biodiversity while polar, Arctic, and Antarctic biomes have lower species diversity? A recent study of mammalian and avian biodiversity compared with weather and climate data, summarized here, suggests that “the […]