‘Geographic research and news’ Category

The mysterious rise of two Caribbean lakes

Here’s some interesting geography news from my part of the world: National Geographic: The Relentless Rise of Two Caribbean Lakes Baffles Scientists. We drove past both Étang Saumâtre and Lake Enriquillo recently and wondered why they were rising. We saw houses under water and noticed that the Dominican immigration and customs houses seemed new and […]

Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries

By JUSTIN GILLIS FEB. 22, 2016 New York Times The oceans are rising faster than at any point in the last 28 centuries, and human emissions of greenhouse gases are primarily responsible, scientists reported Monday. They added that the flooding that is starting to make life miserable in many coastal towns — like Miami Beach, Norfolk, Va., and […]

News from Haiti

My family and I are spending my sabbatical year in Haiti. These days are interesting times for Haiti. After five years in power, current President Michel Martelly (formerly best known as the pop singer Sweet Micky) is holding elections for the next president—who is supposed to assume power on February 7—as well as Parliament, and […]

Fulbright Grant in Haiti

Greetings from Haiti! I am here with my family on a nine-month Fulbright Award to research land use change in Haiti and teach remote sensing of land cover change at the University of Haiti’s School of Agriculture and Veterinary Science. I hope to write a few blog posts from time to time!

Holocene Evolution of the Minnesota River and Tributaries

Here is a great opportunity to hear one of the top scientists on the Minnesota River watershed: Talk: A Slippery Slope: Holocene Evolution of the Minnesota River and Tributaries Dr. Carrie Jennings Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Friday, October 16th 3:00 – 4:15 PM Armstrong Hall Room #15, Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN Sponsored by […]

Faculty-Student Research on Glacier Change in Ecuador

Congratulations to Geography Professor Jeff La Frenierre and Geography and Environmental Studies double major Helen Thompson (’17) for being awarded a Gustavus Presidential Faculty-Student Collaboration Grant for 2015 for their study Hydrological Implications of Glacier Retreat on Andean Volcanoes. They will travel to Ecuador in June for a three-week field season at Volcán Chimborazo. Their […]

Talk: Drones for Science? Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Glacial Watershed Mapping in the Peruvian Andes

Gustavus Adolphus Geography and Environmental Studies present: Drones for Science? Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Glacial Watershed Mapping in the Peruvian Andes Oliver Wigmore, Department of Geography, Ohio State University Thursday May 7, 2015 at 7:00 pm Location: TBD The glaciers of the Peruvian Andes are rapidly retreating, transforming the hydrology and impacting the socio-economic […]

“How to teach about climate without making your students feel hopeless”

Dr. Diana Liverman, a geographer at the University of Arizona, published this piece on the pedagogy of climate change in last month’s Washington Post. “[In the past,] students left my class feeling despondent and powerless. . .How would my students be motivated to do something if they felt paralyzed by fear and hopelessness? . . […]

Irish immigration to rural Minnesota: Gustavus study featured in Rochester’s PostBulletin

Professor Emeritus of Geography, Bob Douglas, and former Gustavus student Carl Cronin’s study of Irish immigration to Minnesota is featured in today’s Rochester Post-Bulletin: “Douglas undertook his mapping of Irish population in Olmsted County after conducting a survey of historic locales for the Olmsted County Planning Department. He and a student, Eric Cronin, combed through […]

Super Bowl LXVIII and the Geography of Fans

If you live in Seattle you’ll likely be cheering for the Seahawks, and if you live in Denver you’ll likely be rooting for the Broncos. But what if you live in Arco, Idaho, equidistant between Denver and Seattle? This New York Times journalist travels to Arco to find out Super Bowl loyalties.