‘Geographic research and news’ Category

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Student Debt: Where in the U.S. is it Highest and Lowest?

A recent report by the Institute for College Access and Success provides information on student debt, including data on student debt by state and region. Nationwide, both the amount of student debt and the percentage of students graduating with debt are increasing. In 2013, 71 percent of graduates had debt and the average debt was […]


Why do the tropics have the highest biodiversity?

A long-standing problem in biogeography is to explain the gradient of biodiversity that decreases as latitude increases. Why do the tropics have the world’s greatest biodiversity while polar, Arctic, and Antarctic biomes have lower species diversity? A recent study of mammalian and avian biodiversity compared with weather and climate data, summarized here, suggests that “the […]


Global map of deforestation, 2000-2012

Geographers working with Google cloud computing experts have released a new interactive map of forest losses and gains between 2000 and 2012.The map is created from Landsat satellite imagery. Humans are the main cause of forest lost, followed by fire, especially in temperate boreal forests. Nearly a third of deforestation occurred in the tropics, with […]


As Climate Warms American West, Iconic Trout In Jeopardy

As readers might recall, I suffer from weather-mania, an affliction inherited from my father.  However, I also suffer from trout-mania, an affliction equally inherited from my father that was born on the small streams of Franconia, Minnesota, and matured on the blue-ribbon streams of southwestern Montana. Today, the very trout that have brought me so […]


How the Los Angeles Aqueduct began

A recent Los Angeles Post feature article provides a history of the L.A. Aqueduct and its visionary, colorful, water chief William Mulholland, celebrated as a hero in Los Angeles but vilified as a thief in California’s Owens Valley, from where the water is diverted.


Guess the Scale: Macro or Micro?

If you love the concept of scale as much as the next geographer, you should check out this Smithsonian website. It contains images collected at the macro scale by a geographer (using remote sensing) and at the micro scale by a herpetologist (using a microscope). Can you guess which are the macro images and which […]


Sri Lankan beach tourism: Sustainable development of the coastline

When Sri Lanka’s internal conflict ended in 2009, miles of tropical beaches became ripe for international development and tourism. In this Al Jazeera opinion piece, Geographers William Moseley and Vinad Malwatte argue that tourism development in Sri Lanka must take into account local communities and environmental impacts. They critique current plans for large resort-style hotels […]


Illegal Clearings in ‘Isolated Indigenous Peoples’ Reserve – Peru

Photos released by the Peruvian government confirm the presence of illegal clearings in the Kaguapakori-Nahua-Nanti Reserve (KNNR).  The KNNR was created in 1990 in an effort to protect the territorial rights of the Nahua and Nanti, who had limited contact with the outside world.  The creation of the Reserve was based primarily on contact between […]


Salary data and trends for careers with a geography degree

  There are many different occupations that require knowledge of and skills in geography. Using information from the U.S. Department of Labor, the Association of American Geographers (AAG) has compiled data on a broad list of occupations related to geography. Using this online careers database, you can explore the diversity of career opportunities available to […]


Monitoring environmental impact: The satellite revolution

Here’s an article in the Washington Post that features SkyTruth, an organization that is using satellite technology to monitor environmental impacts of mining and other extractive industries. “This is the world we’ve built for ourselves — the modern world runs on hydrocarbons — but you have to wonder, floating in a little metal box thousands […]